Archive for April, 2010

NOWSHERA

NOWSHERA

Nowshera – known locally as “Now-khaar” or “Now-Shaar” is the chief city of Nowshera District in the North-West Frontier Province of Pakistan. It is also one of the largest cities of the province and lies on the Grand Trunk Road 27 miles due east of Peshawar at 34°0’55N 71°58’29E
Nowshera city is notable for its colonial era Cantonment, which is located at 33°59’48N 72°0’47E and is home to the Pakistan Army “School of Artillery”, School of ASC, ASC centre, Armour centre and School of Armour of Pakistan Army. The area comprises many Pakhtun tribes including the Badrashi Khattaks, Kakakhel Miangan and Babers. The GT Road is the main road connecting villages and towns across the District. It is also at the junction of Peshawar and Swat Road.
It is the only district of Pakistan with three Cantonments namely Nowshera Cantonment, Risalpur Cantonment and Cherat Cantonment. Nowshera district is spread over a large area with the Kabul River bisecting the district. Nowshera District also borders Punjab province.
The president of the MMA, Qazi Hussain Ahmad, a religious scholar and politician belongs to Nowshera.
History
During British rule, Nowshera was a town and cantonment as well as tehsil of Peshawar District (later Peshawar Division), the town was on the route of North-Western Railway. The population according to the 1901 census of India was 9,518.
The Imperial Gazetteer of India, describes the cantonment as follows:
Today, (30th March, 2008), Nowshera has many education institutions for both boys and girls that mainly include Government Degree College for boys and another for girls. Government Islamia Highy School No. 1 is a legendry source of eduction for Nowsherians.
Attractions
Kund Park is a park in the area, River Kabul and Abasin river flow its sidewise presenting a lovely view. Abasin is dark blue and people like diving and making fun around, it is after this park the two rivers combine but their water can still be distinguished!
Jinnah Park is a park, the river Kabul flows through it, it has a small zoo which nests some peacocks.
The Tomb of the famous Sikh Commander Phula Singh, now an object of pilgrimage to Hindus, Muslims and Sikhs alike, is also situated in Nowshera.
Sports
Cricket, hockey and football are widely played, the famous cricket ground is Garrison Ground, where people gather in evening to play cricket and football in small groups. Regular cricket matches are arranged particularly, on Sunday.

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MARDAN

MARDAN

Mardan is a city situated in Mardan District in the North West Frontier Province of Pakistan. It was the part of ancient Gandhara Civilization. Most of its land is agricultural. It has one of the world’s best irrigation systems, which was laid down by the British government during British Rule on subcontinent (1857-1947). There are still remains of the Gandhara Civilization, scattered in different areas of Mardan. It is also a tourist spot due to its rich culture and hospitality.
History
The area constituting Mardan district is a part of the Peshawar valley, which first appears in history as part of the Gandhara kingdom. The armies of Alexander the Great reached the Indus Valley by two separate routes, one through the Khyber Pass and the other led by Alexander himself through Kunar, Bajaur, Swat, and Buner in 326 BCE. After Alexander’s departure, the valley came under the rule of Chandragupta, who ruled the valley from 297 to 321 BCE. During the reign of the Buddhist emperor Asoka, the grandson of Chandragupta, Buddhism was the religion of the Peshawar Valley. The valley saw the revival of Brahmanism after the Greeks took over in the time of King Mehanda. The Scythians and Indians followed and retained control of the valley till the 7th century CE.
Before the close of the 7th century, the Afghans appeared in the valley. At that time Peshawar valley was under the control of the rulers at Lahore. The Afghans joined the Gakkhars who held the country between the Indus and the Jhelum rivers and compelled the Lahore rulers to cede to them the hill country west of the Indus and south of the Kabul river. In the 10th century the area came under the control of Sultan Sabuktgin who defeated Raja Jaipal, the hindu ruler of Lahore. Sabuktgin’s son Sultan Mahmud of Ghazni made this area as the rallying point for his numerous raids into the interior of India. In the 15th century the Pathans of Ghor overthrew the Ghaznavis and the era of Ghaznavis came to an end. In 1505 the Mughal emperor Babar invaded the area through Khyber Pass. It remained under the rule of the Mughal emperors up to the time of Aurangzeb. During his regime the Pathan tribes revolted and Aurangzeb himself led his army to re-establish his authority but after a hard struggle which lasted for two years(1673-75) he was compelled to agree to the terms which left the Pathans practically independent. In 1738 came the surrender of Peshawar to Nadir Shah by which all the territory west of the Indus, which included present Mardan district was ceded by the Mughals to Nadir Shah.
Ranjit Singh took Attock in 1814 and Peshawar in 1818. He left Hari Singh in command and withdrew himself to Lahore. This valley remained under the control of the Sikhs up to 1849. They were defeated by the British in the Second Sikh War. Major Lawrence was appointed as the first Deputy Commissioner of Peshawar. From hat date Peshawar became an administrative district under the Punjab Government. At that time the present Mardan district was a part of Peshawar district. In 1909 Frontier Province was constituted and in 1937, Peshawar district was bifurcated into Peshawar and Mardan districts.
\(Abbas ul haq uk Burnley )Mardan Toru
Ethnicity and tribes
Mardan district is mainly inhabited by the Yusafzai Pathans but the Lundkhwar valley has sizeable Khattak population. The origin of the Pathans is traced back to two brothers Khakai and Ghori who gave their names to the two divisions of the tribes settled near Qandhar. The Khakal were subsequently expelled by the Ghoris and they settled near Kabul about the middle of the 13th century. When they increased in number and acquired wealth they split into three clans,the Yusafzais, Gigyanis and Turklays. At the close of the 15th century, the Yusafzais and the Gigyanis moved to the plains of Peshawar and eventually ousted the Dalazaks and spread into Buner district. They eventually moved into Mardan district and the area came to be known as “Yusafzai Plain”.
Besides these main tribes, some Sayyeds and Gujars are also found in the district. The Gujars are more in number and some historian told that they are the original inhabitants of the area.
Geography
In the beginning, the name Mardan was given to a small area after the name of Pir Mardan Shah, a prominent religious figure. Gradually, a large surrounding area came to be known as Mardan. The area constituting Mardan district is part of Peshawar valley, which first appears in history as part of Gandhara Kingdom. Until 1937, Mardan district was a part of Peshawar district. In 1937, Mardan was set up as an independent district after the name of its headquarters town.
The district lies from 34° 05′ to 34° 32′ north latitudes and 71″ 48′ to 72° 25′ east longitudes. It is bounded on the north by Buner district and Malakand protected area, on the east by Swabi and Buner districts, on the south by Nowshera district and on the west by Charsadda district and Malakand protected area. The total area of the district is 1632 square kilometers.
Topography
Mardan district may broadly be divided into two parts, north eastern hilly area and south western plain. The entire northern side of the district is bounded by the hills. In the district, the highest points in these hills are Pajja or Sakra, 2056 meters high and Garo or Pato, 1816 meters high. The south western half of the district is mostly composed of fertile plain with low hills strewn across it. It is generally accepted that this plain once formed the bed of a lake which was gradually filled up by the load of the river flowing into from the surrounding hills. From the foot hills the plain runs down at first with a steep slope which carried the rain water to the lower levels and ultimately to the Kabul river.
Rivers and streams
Generally stream flows from north to the south. Most of the streams drain into Kabul river. Kalpani, an important stream of the district rises in the Baizai and flowing southwards join Kabul river. Other important streams which join Kalpani are Baghiari Khawar on the west and Muqam Khawar, coming from Sudham valley and Naranji Khawar from the Narangi hills on the left.
Climate
The summer season is extremely hot. A steep rise of temperature observed from May to June. Even July, August and September record quite high temperatures. During May and June dust storms are frequent at night. The temperature reaches to its maximum in the month of June i.e. 41.50″C. Due to intensive cultivation and artificial irrigation the tract is humid and heat is oppressive. However, a rapid fall of temperature has been recorded from October onwards. The coldest months are December and January. The mean minimum temperature recorded for the month of January the coldest month is 2.09° C.
Most of the rainfall occurs in the month of July, August, December and January. Maximum rainfall recorded for the month of August the rainiest month is 125.85mm. Towards the end of cold weather there are occasional thunder storms and hail storms. The relative humidity is quite high throughout the year while maximum humidity has been recorded in December i.e. 73.33 percent.

MANSEHRA

MANSEHRA

Mansehra city is located at 34°20’N 73°12’ECoordinates: 34°20’N 73°12’E  in Mansehra District, North-West Frontier Province, Pakistan. It is very near to Abbottabad city. It is a major stop for tourists on the Karakoram Highway which leads to China. It is also a major transit point to the northern areas and locations such as the Kaghan Valley, Naran, Shogran, Lake Saiful Mulook and Babusar Top.
History
Mansehra and surrounding areas have a very old history going back thousands of years, the area has been under the rule of Alexander the Great, King Ashoka, and the Turks and British empires. The Turks ruled here for three hundred year, the First Turk ruler who came here in the early part of sixteenth century was Sultan Shahabuddin a great grandson of Amir Taimur. He established his kingdom and named it “Pakhli Sarkar” with its capital at Guli Bagh Mansehra. The last Turk ruler was sultan Mehmud Khurd, he had prepared his own grave but he died in Delhi and could not be buried in the grave he had prepared. This is very precious national monument/heritage but stolen recently by some thieves in Mansehra. Mansehara police recovered it but is still lying in premises of Mansehra Police station. The descendents of these Turks are now living in various parts of Hazara. Prominent among them are Turks (Rajas) of Behali village. A notable relic are the Mansehra rock edicts.
Literacy
Mansehra is located in a province with a literacy rate of 35.41%. In comparison, Pakistan as a whole has literacy rate of 43.92%, while Islamabad leads the nation with a 72.4% literacy rate[3]. Hindko, a dialect of Urdu, is the predominantely spoken first language, but Pashto is also spoken by a large number of people.
Subdivisions
The city of Mansehra is administratively divided into four Union Councils these are[4]:
”        Mansehra City No 1
”        Mansehra City No 2
”        Mansehra City No 3
”        Mansehra(Rural)
Each union council is divided into Mohallas. Prominent Mohallas are:
”        Mohallah Noghazi
”        Mohallah Jabri
”        Upper Channi
”        Lower Channi
”        Basti/Mohallah SherAfzal Khan
”        Chickrialli
”        Dab No1
”        Dab No2
”        Dandi Mohallah
”        Khanbahadar
”        Lohar Baanda
”        Muftiabad
”        Mohallah Narri
”        Sainabad.
”        C & w Colney
Surrounding villages
The rural area surrounding Mansehra city consists of chains of villages that include:
”        Chitta Batta
”        Pakhwal
”        Furrukhabad
”        Aurangabad
”        Behali
”        Karer
”        Jankiary
”        Shargarh
”        Khun Tanol
”        Doganwab
”        Kharyala
”        Dhangri
”        Hajiabad
”        Jaloo
”        Labourkot
”        Ogra
”        Potha
”        Thakra
”        Ghazikot Township Mansehra
”        Sufaida
”        Hado Bandi
”        Maira Amjed Ali
Two main roads lead all the way in to the city, Shinkiari road and Kashmir road. The Karakoram Highway is just outside the city limits of Mansehra. Ghazikot Township is a housing colony just outside the city and is famous for its natural beauty.
Education
Mansehra is a rural city that is known for its raw natural beauty and temperate climate. Unfortunately, when it comes to education, Mansehra is located in a province with a literacy rate of 35.41%In comparison, Pakistan as a whole has literacy rate of 43.92%, while Islamabad leads the nation with a 72.4%[ literacy rate. The First primary school in the district was established in 1872 in the village Behali. Recently there have been schools that are trying to raising the educational standards of the city. Some of these schools came into existence due to international funding, while most are privately owned. These schools include:
”        Sky International School & College, which was founded in 2004.
”        Hazara Convent School, Akbar Khan Road, Mansehra.
”        MCPS,Mansehra City Public School.
”        MIPS, Mansehra International Public School, it has two college campuses.
”        The Pakistan Scout Cadet College was established in 1996 in Batrasi, Mansehra (PSCC).
”        University of Hazara is an HEC recognized University
”        Tameer-i-Nau Public School Mansehra
”        Mansehra Public School(MPS)
”        Al Quran Public School
”        Iqra Collegiate School
”        Islamia Public High School
Apart from these schools, Mansehra is also home to one of the rpominent universities in Pakistan, The Hazara University.
Tribes
The main tribes living in mansehra are Swati, and ,Gujjar(also called sardar Qureshi, Tanoli,Awan and Syed. There are some other tribes which are living in mansehra but they are small in number they include Lodhies and turks. Gillani, Tirmizi,Jilani, from the Syed tribe, Awan are decends of hazarat ali, Khan Khel are from the Swati tribe and Turks living in Behali who were the first ruler of this region. Gillani Syeds came here from (gillan) located in Iraq They are the decends of Hazarat AbdulQadar Jillani Who are the Famous wali of Allah. Tarmizi Syed came here from Swat and are the descendants of Pir Baba Swat, while they originally migrated from Iran to Pakistan. In Mansehra District there is also another tribe called Gujar who speak Gojriand are large in population. Advocate of Village Mangloor was a renowned laywer and a student leader of Independence Movement; when Quaid-e-Azam visited Islamia College Peshawar, he presented Him the donation money collected for Independence Movement.
Nonprofits
Mansehra is also home to a large number of foreign non profit groups, being a gateway to the Kaghan Valley the town has served as a jump off point for groups wishing to provide support after the 2005 Pakistan Earthquake. These groups now own virtually all of the guesthouses and many of the larger buildings in the town, with previous owners mostly having relocated to Islamabad after the quake.

Kohistan District

Kohistan District (Pakistan)

The word Kohistan in Persian literally means Country of the Hills. The Kohistan district has a rich local history as a crossroads between Central, South and Southwestern Asia. Predominantly inhabited by Dardic and Pashtun tribes since ancient times, Kohistan has been invaded and contested by Persians, Greeks, Scythians, Kushans, Turks, Afghans, Mughals, and the British.
History
The Kohistan of the Indus Valley, which is also called Shinkari, “the country of the Shins “by the people themselves is inhabited by what are apparently the remains of a number of tribes of cognate race, whose progenitors once inhabited the valleys skirting the Punjab, and possibly extended to the north and north west have been hitherto confounded under the name of Dards – a name which practically, has no real signification.
Administration
The district is represented in the provincial assembly by three elected MPAs who represent the following constituencies:
”        PF-61 (Kohistan-1)
”        PF-62 (Kohistan-2)
”        PF-63 (Kohistan-3)
Kohistan District is divided into 3 Tehsils (subdivisions):
”        Palas
”        Pattan
”        Dassu
The capital of Kohistan is Dassu.
Geography
Kohistan is a sparsely populated district of the North-West Frontier Province of Pakistan and is also a region that stretches from the border with Azad Kashmir in the east to Afghanistan’s Nuristan province in the west. Located in an area where the Eurasian landplate and Indian subcontinent meet and collide, Kohistan is susceptible to earthquake activity such as the Kashmir earthquake of 2005.
Lush green forests, meadows and streams as well as massive mountains and hills literally make Kohistan resemble the Scottish Highlands of Britain. The Indus River divides Kohistan into two parts with the eastern portion referred to as the Indus Kohistan and the western portion referred to as Swat Kohistan. The Karakoram Highway passes through Kohistan on its way to Gilgit. Most of the cities on the Karakoram Highway in Kohistan are not more than 600m high from sea level.
The word Kohistan literally means land of mountains (koh’i mountain, ‘stan’ land)’ and is one of the most isolated and the most deprived district not only in Hazara Division but in the entire North West Frontier Province (NWFP). Swat is situated to its west, Chilas, Darial and Tangir on the northern side and Naran, Kaghan and Alai valley surround Kohistan from the southern and eastern sides. Dassu is the divisional headquarters, whereas Pattan, Palas and Dassu are the three Tehsils of Kohistan District. It is located in the heart of the Himalayas from 34.40 to 30.35 degrees altitude and from 75.30 to 50.72 degrees longitude. The total area of the District is 7,492 km². It is connected with Dir via the Badawi Pass.
The River Indus flows through Kohistan and divides it socially and culturally. Kohistan is one of the least developed districts in the country and its national significance is the Karakurum Highway. This road is the main source of trade, transportation and link between Pakistan and China. The ancient Silk Road has long been a thoroughfare for the tourists, traders and conquerors from Central Asia and in the past, business delegations would use this passage to travel up to Europe and the Little Asia (Kochak). Kohistan is where the famous Hindukush, Karakuram and Himalayan mountain systems meet and serve as a natural boundary for environmental regions in the chains of Himalayan, Karakurum and Hindukush mountains. This uniqueness of the mountains system also results in rich flora and fauna and therefore gives home to unique species such as the Western Tragopan pheasant and the Snow Leopard.
Climate
The weather of the region tends to be relatively mild with rain, snow and cold temperatures in the winter and mildly hot summers. Kohistan is comprised of mountains and the hilly agricultural regions. The low altitude (below 900m) in Kohistan get very hot in summer and extremely cold in winter season. In the higher regions, weather remains pleasant in summer. Due to the intensive snowfall, travelling to and from the valleys can remain restricted in winter.
Economy
Most Kohistanis rely upon animal husbandry for sustenance and income and tend to use cows, sheep, goats for milk and meat. In addition, the timber industry is on the rise, while many local men travel to find work in Peshawar, Islamabad, Lahore, and Karachi.
The people in Kohistan largely depend on livestock for their livelihood and this is also the reason for their seasonal migration to sub-alpine and alpine pastures of Kohistan and neighbouring valleys and districts. Agriculture development is comparatively poor with only one crop growing in high altitudes and two in the lower areas. Cultivation of crops such as barley and rice has almost been given up.
People usually keep buffaloes, cows, sheep, goats and bullocks. Milk of these animals is not usually sold, but by-products of milk such as butter, are. Other by-products such as wool and skin are utilized for house-consumption and are also sold in the market.
Cash income is rare and people resort to the sale of timber, such as Deodar, Pine, Spruce, Acacia and Oak. Sale of medicinal herbs is also common though there is no check, which impact the seasonal removal of these plants has on the overall population of the species or on the health of the ecosystem.
Besides this, people are also involved in the sale of fuel-wood, farm products such as walnuts and walnut bark (vernacular: dindasa). Honey is also sold in local and provincial markets. In winter season, the local men go to urban areas in search of work.
People and culture
Kohistan’s population is estimated to be over 2 million and is spread across the various towns and villages. Kohistan is predominantly home to various Dardic peoples including the Shina, Kohistanis, Torwalis, Kashmiris, as well as Hindko-speaking Pathans in the central, northern, and eastern sections. Pashtun tribes like Swatis and Afghan refugees can be mainly found in the western part of the district. The people mainly speak Indo-Iranian languages and share various similar cultural traits including the religion of Islam with the majority adhering to the Sunni sect while large minorities of Shia and Ismaili Muslims are also to be found throughout the area. Islam is practiced according to local customs, which may differ significantly from orthodox Islam, especially in regards to Sufi saints, ‘holy wells’, etc.
While the region’s inhabitants were at one time pagans, but never Hindu, John Biddulph has recorded extensively on what he saw to be social mores reminiscint of Hindu customs in late 18th century:
Kohistan covers an area of 7492 sq. Kilometres. The capital lies at Dassu and the District is divided into three Tehsil’s namely Palas, Pattan and Dassu. According to the demographic survey of 1981, the population of district Kohistan is about one million. The average literacy rate is around two percent, but the actual literacy rate based on the field data shows that this rate is three times more.
History provides evidence that civilization in Kohistan matured quite early as compared to adjacent areas were people were worshipping fire, plants and other objects. Islam is the most recent religion dating back only 350 years.
The geographic location, lush green valleys adorned with rich flora and fauna were the biggest attractions for the external invaders. It was also the only passage between China and South East Asia the area remained under constant attacks by Tibetans, Sikhs, Hindus. This constant invasion resulted in one of the most distinctive societies and cultures in the region. “The Rebellion Culture” is the main characteristic of Kohistan and the people of Kohistan are still following the same culture.
Education
The literacy rate is amongst the lowest in Pakistan and hovers around 10%, but education is slowly expanding due to government efforts. After the arrival of Pakistan Army for relief operation for earthquake of October 2005, the education system of has got a sudden boost-up and most of the schools are working. The Army’s commanding Officer of the area Lt.Col.Zakeer and new commanding officer lieutenant colonel Sibghat have taken responsibility of one school in Pattan ([Army Garrison School , Pattan]) which has become a role model for the complete district. In total there are 4x Army supported schools established in District Kohistan which includes Army School for Girls, Shalkanabad (Palas), Army School for boys, Keyal and Community Model School for girls at Pattan.

KOHAT

KOHAT

Kohat is a medium sized town in North West Frontier Province of Pakistan. It is the capital of Kohat District. The town centres around a British-era fort, various bazaars, and a military cantonment. There are a number of tombs of famous personalities in the area, like the Sufi saint and teacher Haji Bahadar Ali Abdullah Shah alias Haji Bahadar Sahib and Mian Fateh Shah (Sherkot, Kohat). The town boasts many mosques and schools. A British built narrow gauge railway runs through the town. To the north of the city lies Kohat Pass.
History
Ancient History
The only other remnants of the Buddhist days is a road cut off the mountain side,[2] on the western skirts of the Jawaki hills near Kotal Post which leads by an even gradient towards the crest.
Kohat Bangash attacked by Babur
Kohat has mix population of Pashto and Hindko speakers.It is the land of gayoor and ghairatman pathans.partial parda system is in kohat.
Sikh and British Rule
In the beginning of 19th century Kohat came under the control of Sikhs Ranjit Singh first marched to Peshawar in 1819 . In 1832 Azim Khan was defeated by Ranjit Singh with great slaughter near Naushera , after which Peshawar Sirdars became tributary to the Sikh Government , who sent an army each year to collect the revenue .[4]In 1834 on the flight of the Sirdars , Hari Singh , the Sikh General , Autar gained possession of Peshawar and a Sikh Governor , Autar Singh Sindhanwalia , was now sent to Kohat . .[5] ultimately withdrew leaving to the administrative control of Khan of Teri in 1836.
Kohat was finally annexed to the British dominion on 28th March 1849 with the rest of Punjab and an Assistant Commissioner was posted here to run the administration and to look after the British interests. In the initial stages of the British administration, the locals of the area posed considerable problems, although some of the tribe later joined with the British Government and helped them in running the area. Nevertheless, the Britishers were never at peace in this part of their Kingdom as resistance and opposition always cropped from one quarter or the other. But their tactics of “Divide and Rule” ultimately strengthened their hold over the region. They put one tribe against the other by giving preference to one against the other and finally succeeded in administration them. An example of unrest against the British empire are the actions of Afridi Ajab Khan, who forced the entire British administration of the district to surrender to his demands.
Ethnicity and Tribes
The main tribes are Bangash and Khattak along with Sayyids, Afridis, Orakzai, Awan, Shinwari, Gilanis, Banurian, Sheikhan and Paracha and Niazi which form the part of the population of the district. A good number of Muhajirs, Afghan Refugees and Bihari repatriates from Bangladesh have also settled in Kohat. The main tribes in Frontier Region Kohat are: Zarghun Khel, Akhurwal, Sheraki, Toor Chappar and Bosti Khel. Pushto is the predominant language while Hindku is mostly spoken and understood in Kohat city and adjacent areas.
Religion
The population of Kohat district is Muslim, the Sunni predominate and there is also large Shias population settled in the district and they stretch from Chikarkot Bala, Sherkot to Kachai (i.e. southern border of Kohat). Usterzai Payan is the largest village of Shia. It is an educated and civilized village. It is also popular because of Al-Asar College.Al-Asr college is run by an NGO.Shia Bangash live in Usterzai Payan and adjasent villages like Chiker Kot Bala, Ali Zo, Khadi Zai, Sher Kot, Usterzai Bala, Khwaja, Khizar, Jauzara, Raisan, Lodikhel, Imbrhamzi, and Kachai. All Shia territory is green and has got many springs ans beautiful gardens. Chali Bagh, Jauzara, and Kachai(Katsi) are famous for their natural springs. People come here in summer day from far of places. There are some Christian families, which settled during the British colonial rule, most of whom are employees of Municipal Committee, Cantonment Board and defence services also reside in Kohat city and Cantonment area. Some scattered families of Hindus also reside in Kohat, Kachai and Marai while a good numbers of Balmiks are employed in various local bodies. These sects are enjoying full religious freedom. People of Kohat are moderate and open minded and open hearted
Geography

Location of Kohat District (highlighted in red) within the North West Frontier Province of Pakistan.
In Buddhist times, two Rajas namely Adh and Kohat settled along the northern border of the district. Raja Kohat gave his name to the town of Kohat and Raja Adh to the fort, the ruins of which are found on the hill side north of Muhammadzai, a village 6 kilometres to the west of Kohat. Another version about this name is that it is a combination of two words, “Koh and Hat” meaning mountain market i.e. a bazar situated in the mountain…… Modification:- (This nomanclature is not correct, as the word “Koh, meaning ‘hill’ is Persian and Hat (pronouced as ‘Hut’ is Sinskrit word. Words from these two languages are not combined to form one word. Instead the entire word is of one language is used in other language.The Two ruler brothers raja Kohat and raja Audh whose fort named ‘Audh samodh ( samodh is short form of “SAMADHI meaning Monument in Sinskrit) can be seen in ruins.This version of is more akin to Kohat name, (Atiq Paracha)
The district lies between 33° – 04′ and 33° – 34′ north latitudes and 70° – 29′ and 72° – 01’ east longitudes. It is bounded on the north by the Orakzai Agency of FATA, tribal areas adjoining Kohat, Peshawar and Nowshera districts, on the east by Attock District of the Punjab province, on the south by Mianwali District of Punjab and Karak District and on the west by Hangu district and the Orakzai agency of FATA.
The total area of the district is 2545 square kilometres.
Physical features/Topography
The topography of the district is dominated by the mountains and hills. In the northwest of the district the important ranges include lower Miranzai and Bangash, which run in an eastwest direction. Further in the south is Kamar -Tanda. The height of these ranges varies from 650 to 1000 meters above the sea level. In the northeast the Sowaki and Adan Khel hills run in a southwest -northeast direction. These hills gradually rise in the extreme northeastern part of the district. The intervening open valleys between the hills are seldom more than eight kilometres in width. The Kohat valley is most important agriculturally rich area. Generally, the district is elevated and the ranges attain only inconsiderable heights above the plain area. The headquarter town of Kohat is more than 550 meters above the sea level.
Rivers and Streams
The river Indus forms the eastern boundary of the district, which separates it from the province of Punjab. Kohat Toi is a principal stream, which enters from Hangu district and flowing to east and southeast, drains into river Indus. The river has a small perennial flow, which disappears before it reaches the town of Kohat, it reappears again at some distance down stream and then flows continuously to the Indus. The Kohat Toi has several small torrents or tributaries, which join it at different places. Another, stream Teri Toi, which flows from west to east, in the southern half of the district, joins the river Indus. The river has a tittle or no perennial flow.
Flora
The common trees are ber, gurgulla, sanatha, phulal, olea etc. All kind of roses, bougain villea, kashmalo, gul-e-nargis, gui-e-dawoodi and other seasonal flowers are planted and sown in the district.
Fauna
Typical wildlife found in the district are hare, jackal, wolf, fox, wild cat, chakor, black partridge, grey partridge, urial, chinkara, blue bull, hogdeer, water fowl.
Transport
List of airports in Pakistan, Kohat Airbase
Much of the transport is privately operated within the city limits. There are also many buses that pass through the city via the Indus Highway. Most going to Peshawar and running between Bannu, D.I. Khan, Islamabad and rest of Pakistan. The railway line is operated between Kohat and Rawalpindi only.
There is a total of 372 kilometres of metalled roads in the district.[citation needed] Indus Highway passes through the district. Some of the main roads include (i) Kohat Khushal Garh road (ii) Kohat Hangu road (iii) Kohat Dhoda Guddi road (iv) Jata Shakardara road.
Due to demand from the people for a tunnel at the Kotal hills, the Government has recently sanctioned a huge amount for this project, benefiting all the southern districts. The work has already been started. The following are some salient features of the project.
”        Total project cost: 6626.75 millions
”        Total length of approached road: 29.8 kilometres
”        Length of north section: 7.7 kilometres
”        Length of south section: 22.20 kilometres
”        Length of tunnel: 1.89 kilometres
”        Width of tunnel: 10.3 meters
”        Black topped: 7.3 meters
”        Shoulders: 3.0 meters
”        Time of completion: 48 months
Utility services
The city is facilitated with two dams; Tanda Dam and Gandiali Dam. The former is located in the SW of the city and the later is located in the SE. Moreover , the city is giving a good friendship symbol between Japan and Pakistan by having a 1.8km long tunnel constructed by Taisei Corporation of Japan.
Villages and towns
Mian khel Jangle Khail Togh Bala, Bili Tang, Babari Banda, Gumbat, Nusrat Khel, Chiker Kot Bala, Sher Kot, Ali zai Khadi zai, Ustera Zai Payan and Usterzai Bala, Kachai,Lachi Shah Pur, Jarma, Garhi Rauf Khan,sumari bala Jungle Khel, Shekan, K.D.A,satellite town (Kohat Development Authority) Pershai, Kandar, Gul Hasan Banda, Chorlakki, Kirri Shekhan, Jabbar, Nakband, Khushal Garh

 

 

HARIPUR

HARIPUR

Haripur formerly a military cantonment, was renamed in honour of the Sikh general Hari Singh Nalwa in 1822 and became the headquarters of Hazara (until 1853). Hari Singh Nalwa was appointed by Raja Ranjit Singh as the second Nazim of Hazara after the first Nazim Amar Singh Majithia was killed by the local populace.
Haripur was built as a fortress surrounded by a wall which was four yards thick and sixteen yards high and had only four openings. That fort later became the city police station and the road was named Fort Road (which is near to the village Sikandarpur) and there is a famous University AIOU Campus named (SUIS) is based. Drinking water was provided by digging a tank. Many small drains were dug to carry sullage water. There is a small river that passes through the city named river Dore whose water leads to the Tarbela Dam. Baron Hugal visited the town on December 23, 1835, and he found the town humming with activity. The municipality was constituted in 1867.
An obelisk marks the grave of Colonel Canara, a European officer of the Sikh Artillery, who fell in 1848 defending his guns single-handed against the insurgents under Chattar Singh.
In 1851 the 4th (Hazara) Mountain Battery was raised from Hazara gunners who were trained by Major Abbott in order to defend Hazara District. The Hazaras embarked on many campaigns throughout the province.
The population in 1901 was 5,578 and the income and expenditure during the ten years ending 1902-3 averaged Rs. 17,800. In 1903-4 the income and expenditure were Rs. 19,100 and Rs. 20,000 respectively.
Geographical Features
To the south of Haripur only miles away lie the ancient Buddhist university town of Taxila. To the north within miles is the world’s largest rockfilled dam, Tarbela Dam, the bulwark of Pakistani power generation and irrigation system. Also to the south lies the picturesque Khanpur dam which supplies drinking water to Islamabad and Rawalpindi.
Close to the city of Haripur also lies the industrial area of Hattar. Another major industrial complex lying at the outskirts of the main Haripur city is the Telephone Industries of Pakistan or TIP (The biggest Telephone factory in whole ASIA). Such as another industry just next to TIP is National Radio telecommunication Corporation (NRTC).
Haripur is a green valley rich in fruits and vegetables and serves as the base market for the mountainous cities of Abbottabad and Mansehra and rest of Hazara Division. It is currently the major city of Haripur district, one of the five districts that used to comprise Hazara Division namely Haripur, Abbottabad, Mansehra, Batagram and Kohistan.
Famous People
”        Field Marshal Ayub Khan
”        Sultan Raja Erij Zaman Khan – Chief of Gakhars and Ex-MPA
”        Raja Sikander Zaman – Ex Chief Minister, NWFP.
”        Air Chief Marshal Muhammad Anwar Shamim.
”        Sardar Bahadur Khan – Ex Federal Railways Minister and Leader of the Opposition.
”        Sardar Muhammad Mushtaq Khan Current MNA of Haripur and Ex-MPA and Provincial Minister NWFP.
”        Sardar Fakr-e-Alam Khan Ex-election comisioner of Pakistan and Ex-Chief Justice Peshawar High Court
”        Yousaf Ayub Khan – Ex NWFP Minister.
”        Qateel Shifai, famous Urdu language poets of Pakistan

CHATRAL

CHATRAL

Chatral is basically translated into “field” in the native language Khowar. It’s the name of the tribe, town, valley, river, district and former princely state in the Malakand Division of the Northwest Frontier Province of Pakistan. Chitral Town, capital of the Chitral District, is situated on the west bank of the Chitral (or Kunar) River. The town is at the foot of Tirich Mir, the highest peak of the Hindu Kush, 7,708 m or 25,289 ft high. It has a population of 20,000, while the District (of 14,833 km² or 5,727 sq mi), has a population of 300,000. The altitude of the valley is 1,100 m or 3,700 ft.
       Geography
The easiest access to Chitral is in the southwest along the Chitral/Kunar valley towards Jalalabad. This route is open all year and provides direct access to Kabul. However the Pakistan-Afghanistan border (Durand Line) prevents this being used as an internal route to Peshawar and the south. The other routes are over mountain passes. To the south, the Lowari Pass (3,200 m or 10,499 ft) leads 365 km (227 mi) to Peshawar. In the north, the easiest route during summer runs over the Broghol Pass (3,798 m or 12,460 ft) to Afghanistan’s Wakhan Corridor, however during winter this route is usually closed. To the east, there is a 405 km (252 mi) route to Gilgit over the 3,719 m (12,201 ft) Shandur Pass. And in the west, the Dorah Pass provides an additional route to Afghanistan. The territory is home to rare falcons and the snow leopard, and is cut off by snow from the rest of the country for six months a year a problem soon to be relieved by the currently under construction Lowari Tunnel which will reduce transit time to Chitral as well as allow the district to be connected to the rest of the country even during the cold winter months.
       Population
The main tribe, the Khow, speak Khowar (or Chitrali), one of the Dardic languages, which is also spoken in parts of Yasin, Gilgit and Swat. Pashto language is also spoken and understood by some in the city. Chitral is known for the famous Kalash tribe native inhabitants that ruled the region for centuries later invaded by “Khow”, Kalasha resides in three remote valleys west of Ayun, which is ten miles down from Chitral town. The culture is Islamic due to its proximity to Afghanistan and contrasts considerably with the urban cities of Pakistan as well as the adjacent district of Gilgit. Women are nearly invisible except to their male relatives and other women. They do not walk the streets of town, so men or children do the shopping. Travel requires the company of a close male relative and sometimes the wearing of a burqa.[1] There is also a sizeable population of Nuristanis, Tajiks and Uzbeks most of whom arrived from Afghanistan in the late 1980s.
       Sport
Polo is a popular sport in Chitral and an annual polo festival between Gilgit and Chitral is held at the highest polo ground in the world, at the Shandur Pass. This festival is known as the ‘Shandur Polo Festival’ and attracts lots of International and local tourists. Sikander Ul Mulk is the captain of the Chitral Polo team for more than a decade and is considered to be a local Hero in Chitral. Other games like cricket, football, basketball, volleyball, hockey, martial arts etc are also played. Chitral is the home town of Pakistani international football player Muhammad Rasool& international ethlite Ali Amir from Karimabad Chitral.
       Chitral Bazaar
Chitral Bazaar consists of two main bazaars joined together. The Shahi Bazaar and the Ataliq Bazaar. Chitral Bazaar starts from the ‘Chew Bridge’ and ends up at the Polo Ground of Chitral. Two of the main chowks of chitral bazaar are: PIA chowk and the Ataliq chowk.
       History
A British garrison, sent from Gilgit to oversee the smooth transition of power to the heir apparent after a ruler was murdered, was besieged in Chitral Fort for over a month in 1895.

 

ABBOTTABAD

ABBOTTABAD

Abbottabad  is the principal city of Abbottabad District in the North-West Frontier Province of Pakistan. It is located 150 km north of Islamabad and 205 km from Peshawar, at an altitude of 4120 feet (1250 m) above sea level. The city is located in the Orash Valley, and is known for its pleasant weather, educational institutes of high standards and military establishments. It remains a hub for tourism in the summer.Abbottabad was a city of British India and the headquarters of Hazara Division (then a district). It was named after Major James Abbott. Major Abbott settled this district in 1853 after the annexation of the Punjab and he became its first Deputy Commissioner. Abbottabad was an important military cantonment and sanatorium, being the headquarters of a brigade in the second division of the northern army corps The garrison consisted of four battalions of native infantry (Gurkhas) and four native mountain batteries. In 1901 the population of the town and cantonment was 7764. In 1902 income averaged around Rs. 14,900 and the expenditure around Rs. 14,000. In 1903 the income averaged Rs. 22,300, chiefly derived from octroi, while expenditure was around Rs. 18,100. The receipts and expenditure of cantonment funds during the ten years ending 1902-3 averaged Rs. 7,300. The chief public institutions were the Albert Victor unaided Anglo-Vernacular High School, a municipal Anglo-Vernacular High School and a Government dispensary.. Before leaving, Major Abbott wrote a poem titled “Abbottabad”.
Partition
In June 1948, the British Red Cross opened a hospital in Abbottabad to deal with 80-100 patients daily who were being “brought in from the Kashmir fighting areas”.
2005 Earthquake
On the 8 October 2005 Abbottabad was devastated by the Kashmir earthquake. Although most of Abbottabad survived many old buildings were destroyed or damaged.
Demographics
In 1998, the population of Abbottabad District was 881,000 with mostly Jadoons, Abbasis, Sardars spread all over the district and have strong political influence. The other cast is Karal, syed,Awan. According to the 1998 census, over 94.26% of the population speak Hindko as their first language, Punjabi- 2.30%, Pashto- 2.22% and Urdu- 1.05%.Although the first language of many is Hindko, Urdu, which is the national language of Pakistan, is understood and spoken by everyone and is commonly used. English, on the other hand, is widely used in business and education.
Education
With its good weather and beautiful landscape, Abbottabad attracts people from all over Pakistan, some for tourism but many by its educational institutions. Abbottabad (sometimes called “The City of Schools”) is home to a number of schools, colleges and training institutes. These educational institutions help to promote a high standard of education in the entire country.
Military Training Institutes
Military Training Institutes like the PMA Kakul, (Pakistan Military Academy) the Regimental Training centres of the Pakistan Army are also located in Abbottabad.
Medical And Engineering Institutes
Abbottabad has four Medical Colleges and two Engineering universities. In Medical colleges there are Ayub Medical College, Women Medical College, Frontier Medical College and Abbottabad International Medical College. And the Engineering universities are Comsats Institute Of Information Technology Abbottabad and a campus of UET Peshawar(University of Engineering and Technology).
Schools and Colleges
The Government Postgraduate College offers higher education of Bachelors and Masters level in Literature, Natural Sciences and Exact Sciences. The college attracts students from all over the NWFP. A few Technical Institutions like Government Polytechnical Institute offer courses for skill-based technical & industrial education e.g Diploma in Associate Engineering. Quite a few Computer Institutes are also functioning in and around Abbottabad. These institutes are generally affiliated with Board of Technical Education, Peshawar. Other than that, many private and government school and colleges are located in Abbottabad city which are renowned for their high standard of education. Among these are Abbottabad Public School, IQRA Academy, Abbottabad Jamia Public School, Al-Imtiaz Academy, Army Burn Hall College, Pine Hills Public School and College and Pakistan International Public School and College. Federal Govt Boys/Girls Public High School, Pine View Road & a branch of the famous Beacon House School System.
Transport
Abbottabad’s main public transport consist of modified Suzukis, which can accommodate anywhere from 8 to 13 people at one time. Taxis are also available as well as wagons which connect Abbottabad to the surrounding cities and towns in the region. Abbottabad is also served by Daewoo Express, a national bus service which connects over 50 cities in Pakistan.
Tourism
According to the Imperial Gazetteer of India, “the town is picturesquely situated at the southern corner of the Rash (Orash) plain, 4,120 feet (1,260 m) above the sea”[2]. Like much of the mountainous Northern Areas of Pakistan, tourism is one of the important sources of economic activity in Abbottabad, in summer when temperatures in the plains of Pakistan rise to well above 45 degrees Celsius, large number of tourists travel north to Abbottabad to shelter from the blistering heat. The Karakoram Highway, which traces one of the paths of the ancient Silk Road, starts from Havelian 15 km south of the Abbottabad town, and passes through the city. The Karakorum Highway is an attraction for the adventure tourists. Abbottabad is the last big town, the first mild-weather tourist city in Northern Pakistan for the tourists coming from the plains in the south. specially kaghan colony abbottabad very beautiful place. From: (MR jameel UR Rahman Sharepoint Consultant)
Places of Tourism
The Karakoram, Himalayas and the Hindu Kush ranges can be approached from Abbottabad as continues to be a transit city for tourists, serving as a base for visits to numerous nearby places, such as Hunza, Gilgit, Skardu and Indus Kohistan, of the Karakoram Range. Knowledge Inn Public School (Pind Kargu Khan)
Notable people
”        Amanullah Khan Jadoon – Former Minister of Petroleum
”        Iqbal Khan Jadoon – Former Chief Minister N.W.F.P
”        Sardar Hadar Zaman Khan – Current District Nazam
”        Anaitullah Khan Jadoon – Current Member Provincial Assembly
”        Dr.Syed Mehboob – Famous writer, columnist and researcher
”        Sardar Mahtab Ahmad Khan- Former Chief Minister of NWFP, current Railways Minister.
”        Sultan Sakoon – famous Urdu poet

 

THATTA

THATTA

Thatta or Thatto is an historic town of 22,000 inhabitants in the Sindh province of Pakistan, near Lake Keenjhar, the largest freshwater lake in the country. Thatta’s major monuments are listed among the World Heritage Sites. Due to its proximity to the huge port of Karachi, the picturesque old town is frequented by visitors, especially on weekends.
History
The city, formerly commanding the delta of the Indus, was the capital of Lower Sindh from the 14th century. During the ruling period of Soomro Tribe Thatta was the capital of Sindh for 95 years. Between 1592-1739, it was governed in the name of the Mughal emperors of Delhi. In 1739 however following the Battle of Karnal the province was ceded to Nadir Shah of Persia, after which Thatta fell into neglect.
Sights
Thatta’s monuments include the Jama Mosque (also Shahjehani Mosque and Badshahi Mosque), built by Shah Jahan in 1647-49 and lined with glazed tiles. This edifice has 101 domes and is designed in such a way that imam’s voice can reach every corner of this building without the help of any loudspeaker or other device.
There are also the tombs of Jam Nizamuddin, Satihoo Seven Soomro Sisters (reigned in 1461-1509), several Tarkhan rulers and Mughal officials. A vast old necropolis with thousands of graves may be found at the nearby Makli Hills.
Famous Personalities of Thatta District
”        Sardar M Usman Soomro
”        Mohammad Khan Soomro
”        Sardar Mohammad Ali Soomro
”        Dr. Abdul Wahid Soomro
”        Abdul Hameed Soomro
”        Sanaullah Soomro
”        Honourable Sir Syed Miran Mohammad Shah
”        Sayed Bashir Ahmed Shah
”        Sayed Akhtar Husain Shah
”        Sayed Azhar Ahmed Shah
”        Dr.Arbab Wazir Memon
”        Babu Ghulam Hussain Memon
”        Abdul Latif Memon
”        Abdul Majeed Memon
”        Abdul Jaleel Memon
”        Ejaz Ali Shah Sheerazi
”        Shafqat Hussain Shah Sheerazi
”        Shah Hussain Shah Sheerazi
”        Ayaz Ali Shah Sheerazi
”        Riaz Hussain Shah Sheerazi
”        Manzoor Hussain Shah Sheerazi
”        Ali Raza Shah Sheerazi
”        Karim Dino Shah Sheerazi
”        Ghulam Qadir Palijo
”        Hamzo Palijo
”        Rasool Bux Palijo
”        Sassui Palijo
”        Sarmad Palijo
”        Sahib Dino Gah
”        Mamoon Khan Malkani
”        Ghulam Qadir Malkani
”        Mohammad Ali Malkani
”        Haji Usman Malkani
”        Ghulam Qadir Chandio
”        Rais Iqbal Khan Chandio

 

 

SUKKUR

SUKKUR

Sukkur formerly Aror, is the third largest city of Sindh province, situated on the west bank of Indus River (Pakistan) in Sukkur District. When Arabs invaded Sukkur (Sindh) in the 10th century, they found an extreme climate (hot and cold), and called it Saqar, which means intense. Sukkur is nicknamed Darya Dino meaning the gift of river), as without the Indus the would be a desert.
Administration
The city of Sukkur, as well as being district headquarters, is the capital of Sukkur Taluka and contains one Union Council.
Geography & climate
The district of Sukkur (whose name is derived from its head quarter Sukkur city) covers an area of 5,165 square kilometres. Geographically it is spanned from 27°05′ to 28°02′ north latitudes and from 68°47′ to 69°43′ east longitudes. The city of Sukkur is located at an altitude of 220 feet (67 m) from sea level, having terrestrial coordinates 68°52′ east and 27°42′ north. It is also the narrowest point of the lower Indus course.
Sukkur district shares northern border with Shikarpur and (recently constituted) Kashmore districts. Ghotki is located on the north-eastern side while Khairpur on the south. Sukkur also shares its border with India (Jaisalmer, Rajasthan). Sukkur is also connected by road air with all major cities of Pakistan.
The climate of the Sukkur is characterized by hot and hazy weather during summer days while dry and cold in winter. During January, temperature ranges from 7 to 22 °C (44 to 71 °F). The summer (month of June before monsoon) temperature averages 35 °C (95 °F) though it often reaches up to 52°C (107 °F). Generally the summer season commences in March – April and ends before October. The average rainfall of the district is 88 mm, (ranges from 0.59 mm to 25.62 mm) per annum.
History
Sukkur has been an important strategic centre and trading route from time immemorial. Alor (or Aror, Sukkur) held the status of capital under the reign of Musikanos, when Alexander invaded India in 326 BCE. The ruins of this ancient town still exist, 8 km east of Rohri, in Sukkur district. In 711 CE, the Arabs invaded Sindh, led by 17 years old Muhammad bin Qasim, and Sukkur (including all of Sindh and lower Punjab) became part of the Umayyad Caliphate. Later Mughals and many semi-autonomous tribes ruled over Sukkur. The city was ceded to Mirs of Khairpur between 1809 and 1824. In 1833, Shah Shuja (a warlord of Kandahar, Afghanistan) defeated the Talpurs near Sukkur and later made a solemn treaty with the Talpur ruler, by which he relinquished all claims on Sindh. In 1843, the British (General Charles James Napier) defeated the Talpurs at the battles of Miani and Dubbo near Hyderabad , Sukkur along with the rest of Sindh was under British rule until the independence of Pakistan in 1947. The (current) district of Sukkur was constituted in 1901 out of part of Shikarpur District, the remainder of which was formed into the Larkana District. Sukkur saw a significant socio-economic uplift after the 1930s, when the British built the world largest barrage here on te Indus River. After independence of Pakistan, thousands of Muslim immigrants arrived in Sukkur while a much larger number of Hindus left for India.
Demography
At the time of Pakistan’s independence in 1947, Sukkur district was comprised approximately 200,000 habitants, mostly engaged in agricultural pursuits and fishing industry. Over time, Sukkur has seen a moderate rise in population (2 to 2.5% per annum) as compare to Pakistan’s, except in late 60s and early 70s when population growth rate reached 4.43% (1972 census) due to internal migration and establishment of some large bridges on river Indus. According to official census of 1998, Sukkur has 908370 habitants and density of 175.9 persons per square kilometre. The current estimate (on the basis of 2.88% annual growth) shows that Sukkur population has surpassed 1 million.
Sukkur is chiefly dominated by Muslims that constitute 96% of the total population, of which, the Shia form a clear majority. But it also has relatively greater proportion of Hindus and Christians than the rest of the country, Hindus, mostly settled in urban areas and engaged in trade and services sector. Ethnically Sindhis share the biggest segment of population (84%), followed by Muhajirs (07%). Sukkur is also domicile of many BalochBaloch tribes, including, Rind, Chandio, Gabol, Khoso and Leghari. Amongst others like Syed, Soomro,Mangrio, Phulpoto and many more. There are Memon, Punjabi and Siraiki sections. Traditionally Memons were associated with trade and retail business but during last two decades they have ascended as an active social and economic front. Soomro are basically associated with educational and social fields for its development they perform steps ahead day and night.
Education
Sukkur has many renowned colleges and academic institutions, some of important names include;
”        Virtual University of Pakistan, Sukkur Campus
”        Institute of Business Administration (IBA) Sukkur
”        G.M Mahar Medical College
”        College of Management Science & Information technology Sukkur (Affiliated with Shah Abdul Latif University, Khairpur)
”        SiSTech Sukkur (Affiliated with University of Sindh, Jamshoro)
”        Government Islamia Science/arts/commerce College Sukkur
”        Public School and college Sukkur
”        Government Degree College and Post Graduate Studies Centre
”        Government Girls College Sukkur
”        Government Degree Science College Pano Akil
”        Government College of Physical Education
”        Government College of Education
”        Government M,P,L Boys high School.
”        Agha Nizamuddin Girls Degree College
”        Sayed Atta Hussain Shah Musavi Degree College Rohri
”        Government Polytechnic Institute
”        Government Modern High School
”        Saint Mary’s Church And High School
”        Government Double Section High School
”        Government High School
”        Government Comprehensive High School
”        Government Double Section High School Barrage Colony Sukkur.
”        Army public school and college (federal board)
Sukkur Barrage
The Sukkur Barrage have 66 Gates. The Sukkur barrage (formally called Lloyd Barrage), built under British Raj on the Indus river, controls one of the largest irrigation systems in the world. The work for the bridge was started in 1923 and completed in January 1932. The 5000 feet long barrage is made of yellow stone and steel and can water nearly 10 million acres (40,000 km²) of farmland through its large seven canals. Some of the canals are larger than the Suez Canal.
In November 2004, the government of Pakistan initiated a rehabilitation project to revitalize its water storage capacity and distribution efficiency. The project completed in July 2005, (with less than the allocated amount of Rs. 887 million). Experts believe that the rehabilitation of the barrage has enhanced its efficiency for another 60 to 70 years.
Economy
Industry
Sukkur is a hub of many small and large scale industries. Among important industries are cotton textiles, cement, leather, tobacco, paint and varnish, pharmaceuticals, agriculture implements, hand pumps, lock making, rice-husking, and sugar. Small-scale cottage industries comprise hosiery, boat making, fishing accessories, thread ball spooling, trunk making brass-wares, cutlery and ceramics.
Agriculture
Sukkur had a large fertile and cultivable land till few decades ago, when the Indus river was not as barren as today. Now its agricultural productivity has much reduced. It could not achieve reasonable yield per unit area over time, on account of continuous shortage of water and ignorance of modern irrigation system. Despite lack of water, during kharif, rice, bajra, cotton tomatoes and peas are cultivated whereas during rabi main crops are wheat, barley, gram and melons. Sukkur is famous world over, for its delicious dates. Sukkur also holds a large number of Riveraine forest on the course of Indus. These tropical forests are found within the protective embankments on either side of Indus. During 1997-98 the total area under forests was 510 km² which yielded 55,000 cubic feet (1600 m³) of timber and 27000 cubic feet (760 m³) of firewood besides other miner products.
Sites of interest
”        Rohri
”        Aror (ruins of historical city)
”        Tomb of Shah Khairuddin Jillani
”        Tomb of the Seven Maidens Sateen Jo Aastan
”        Tomb of Abdul Baqi Purani, Ex-Governor of Bukkur.
”        Bukkur Island
”        Tomb of Syed Hakim Ali
”        Minaret of Masum Shah
”        Sadh Belo Temple on River Indus
”        Thermal Power Station Sukkur
”        Lansdowne Bridge Rohri
”        Sukkur (Lloyd) Barrage
”        Lab-e-Mehran
”        Jafry Manzil (on Miani Road)
”        Lansdowne Bridge
”        Shahi Bazaar, Frere Road
”        Ayub Gate
”        Ladies and Children Hill Park
”        Looks Parak/Qasim Park
”        Barrage colony
”        Purana Sukkur (Old Sukkur)
”        Sheikh Shaheen Road Sukkur
”        Raharki sahib
Notable people
”        Asadullah Bhutto (MNA) (Politician)
”        Dr Nasrullah Baloch (MPA)
”        Ayaz Gul (poet)
”        Mumtaz Bukhari Novelist, story writer, TV drama writer, translator, columnist and journalist.
”        Dr Mohammad Afzal Arain Dermatologist

 

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